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Argumentative August #5 – Breaker Morant (1980) – movierob.wordpress.com

Rob and I would like to once again welcome you to another review for our Argumentative August Blogathon. This next film, Breaker Morant is being reviewed by Rob at movierob.wordpress.com. Let’s see what he thought of this movie…

Breaker Morant 2 “The barbarities of war are seldom committed by abnormal men. The tragedy of war is that these horrors are committed by normal men in abnormal situations.” – Major Thomas

Number of Times Seen – 1 (19 Aug 2015)

Brief Synopsis – Three Australian officers during the Boer War in 1902 are accused of executing prisoners when in reality they were following orders of their superiors.

My Take on it – This movie tells a true tale of an event that happened over 110 years ago but is still relevant today.

The question that remains is whether acts committed against an enemy during war are considered justified or not.

In this movie, 3 officers are put on trial for carrying out orders of their superiors and the question constantly that one asks himself in these kind of situations is where does the responsibility of an order end?

Many movies and books raise this same question and the answer is always unclear; is each individual soldier responsible for deciding what orders are right or wrong or must they follow those orders hoping that their superiors will take the responsibility.

The movie that I found this to be somewhat similar to was The Andersonville Trail (1970), which was based on a play about the trial of Confederate soldiers after the Civil War who ran a POW camp. I remember reading the play back in high school and it had such an impact on me, I still remember some of the scenes even today 25 years later.

Edward Woodward and Bryan Brown are both great as two of the officers standing trial.

Bottom Line – Great look at whether soldiers are accountable for following orders. Woodward and Brown are very good in their roles. This is a similar idea to the Andersonville Trial (1970) and raises many questions as to whether acts of war against an enemy are justifiable or not. Certain scenes drag a bit, but overall it’s pretty compelling drama. Recommended!

MovieRob’s Favorite Trivia – As a result of the trial of Morant, Handcock, and Witton, the Australian Army refused to ever again allow their troops to be tried by British court-martial. All future charges against Australian soldiers would be put before fellow Australians. (From IMDB)

Rating – Globe Worthy (7/10)

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